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A Beautiful Fall Poem…

A Beautiful Fall Poem...

leaf piles beckon

every age–

nature knows

what the soul needs;

what we forgot

golden sun washes faces

as crisp winds

leave kisses

on cheeks

and apples

harvest light bathes

living room floorboards

like butter

while cinnamon

curls the air

candles dance

and firesides begin

conversations

of crackling coziness

days too quickly dim

as fall envelops us in her

vibrant sweater of warmth,

and home,

and

each other.

 

_Liza McNamara, Sr. Editor

A Beautiful Fall Poem...A Beautiful Fall Poem...A Beautiful Fall Poem...A Beautiful Fall Poem...A Beautiful Fall Poem...A Beautiful Fall Poem...

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How to write a Thanksgiving blessing – Part II

How to write a Thanksgiving blessing   Part II

Now that you’ve had some time to pull your own ideas and thoughts together using the tips from our last blog post, we thought we’d share with you some favorite traditional prayers and inspirational poems that you may like to lead with, or combine with your own expression of thanks.

Remember, gratitude in and of itself is a beautiful thing and there is no right or wrong way to speak about it. Simply relax and speak from your heart, and enjoy the opportunity to let those around you know how thankful you are that you’re all together for Thanksgiving.

Poems, Graces and Prayers:

  • Bless us, O Lord
    and these Thy gifts,
    which we are about to receive from your bounty.
    Through Christ our Lord.
    Amen.
  • Bless this home
    with love and cheer,
    And bless all those
    who gather here.
  • Thank you for the day so sweet,
    Thank you for the food we eat,
    Thank you for the birds that sing,
    Thank you, Lord, for everything!
  • Every so often, we all need a day to stop everything we’re so busy doing
    and simply be. A day to turn off all the noise and step outside to breathe
    in the air, and to know we are part of something bigger than ourselves.
    A day to realize the richness of our blessings, the miracles we are,
    the wonder that is our lives, the gratitude in our hearts.
  • With a prayer that this beautiful season
    gives us many new reasons
    to rejoice and thank the Lord.
  • Thanksgiving is a time of awareness,
    of caring and sharing —remembering the best,
    seeing the beautiful,
    being grateful for the fullness of life.

Chinese Proverb
When you eat, remember the farmer.

From the Poem i thank You God
by E. E. cummings
i thank You God for most this amazing
day…for everything
which is natural which is infinite which is yes

Servant’s Heart
Dear Lord, thank you for this gift of food
You’ve placed upon our table.
And help us all to do your work
In any way we’re able.

Serving Food by Thich Nhat Hanh
In this food, I see clearly
The presence of the universe
Supporting my existence.

Grace
by Ralph Waldo Emerson
For each new morning with its light,
For rest and shelter of the night,
For health and food, for love and friends,
For everything Thy goodness sends,
We offer thanks. Amen.

A Blessing based on Gandhi’s Principles
Oh God, bless this food we are about to receive.
Give bread to those who hunger; and hunger for justice to us who have bread.

Shortest Grace by Dag Hammarskjöld
For what has been—thanks! For what shall be—yes!

How to write a Thanksgiving blessing   Part IIHow to write a Thanksgiving blessing   Part IIHow to write a Thanksgiving blessing   Part IIHow to write a Thanksgiving blessing   Part IIHow to write a Thanksgiving blessing   Part IIHow to write a Thanksgiving blessing   Part II

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Halloween Poem…

Halloween Poem...

All Hallow’s Eve

As Scorpio claws the moonlit sky,
the bats and owls in flight soar by.

 The fog is thick; the night air, chill,
and shadows shift upon the hill.

The Jacks smile wide as willows weep,
as if dark secrets they do keep.

The spirits rise, the dead–they roam,
while witches recite their evil tomes.

This Halloween; this mystic night,
makes mortals wary of ghostly sights.

For the veil is lifted to worlds unseen,
on this hallowed night of Halloween!

Halloween Poem...Halloween Poem...Halloween Poem...Halloween Poem...Halloween Poem...Halloween Poem...

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A MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTE

This Memorial Day, as we honor our fallen men and women in uniform who have served since America’s birth, let us take a moment to reflect upon the sacrifices they have made in the name of freedom for all.

The following poem pays tribute to those who have given their lives so that others may pursue America’s great promise of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

A MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTE

Fallen For Freedom

With every fallen hero,
And every sacrifice,
Each man and woman serving
Knows freedom has its price.

As stars and stripes fly higher
Over lands, both far and near,
New generations take the pledge
To protect what we hold dear.

And should that mean they offer up
Their lives for liberty
Their sacrifice is not in vain—
For freedom isn’t free

And so today we honor those
Who have been laid to rest—
Remembering that these brave souls
Gave better than their best.

~Brian MacDougall

 

A MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTEA MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTEA MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTEA MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTEA MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTEA MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTE

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MOTHER’S DAY QUOTES

An Amazing Journey…

MOTHERS DAY QUOTESMother’s Day, Sunday, May 12, is the most special day of the year to celebrate the unique and wonderful women who make an incredible difference in our lives. And while every mom has her own style, wisdom, gifts and legacy, one thing all mothers have in common is a lifelong journey of love. So whether Mother’s Day inspires you to take a walk down memory lane, surround yourself with family, or excitedly anticipate your baby-to-be, here’s a collection of heartfelt and humorous quotes that celebrates the amazing journey of motherhood, even before it begins…

Making the decision to have a child – it is momentous. It is to decide forever to have your heart go walking around outside your body.  ~Elizabeth Stone

Nobody will ever know the strength of my love for you, after all you’re the only one who knows what my heart sounds like from the inside.                       ~Author Unknown

His little hands stole my heart…and his little feet ran away
with it.  ~Author Unknown

I never knew how much love my heart could hold until someone called me “mommy.”   ~Author Unknown

A mother will sit in the rain to watch her child sit on a bench.            ~Author Unknown

There is an instinct in a woman to love most her own child—and an instinct to make any child who needs her love, her own.  ~Robert Brault

A mom’s love waits up when the rest of the world has turned out the light.  ~Author Unknown

My mother had a great deal of trouble with me, but I think she enjoyed it.   ~Mark Twain

A mother is one to whom you hurry when you are troubled.                   ~Emily Dickinson

Just you feel like you’re all grown up and don’t need your mommy, you get the flu. ~Author Unknown

 The advice my son rejected is now being given by him to my grandson.   ~Author Unknown

 

 

 

MOTHERS DAY QUOTESMOTHERS DAY QUOTESMOTHERS DAY QUOTESMOTHERS DAY QUOTESMOTHERS DAY QUOTESMOTHERS DAY QUOTES

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NATIONAL POETRY MONTH

NATIONAL POETRY MONTH

The Academy of American Poets created National Poetry Month in 1996 to build awareness of the rich heritage of classic and contemporary poets and poems and their impact on our culture. Celebrated by bookstores, libraries, schools, and bloggers, the hope is that more of us will become aware of the joys of poetry.  Celebrated Poet, Billy Collins, wrote this somewhat humorous piece about our desires to understand poetry.

“Introduction to Poetry”

I ask them to take a poem
and hold it up to the light
like a color slide

or press an ear against its hive

I say drop a mouse into a poem
and watch him probe his way out,

or walk inside the poem’s room
and feel the walls for a light switch.

I want them to waterski
across the surface of a poem
waving at the author’s name on the shore.

But all they want to do
is tie the poem to a chair with a rope
and torture a confession out of it.

They begin beating it with a hose
to find out what it really means.

~Billy Collins, Poet Laureate of the United States 2001-2003

Billy Collins writes, teaches, and inspires all of us with his gifts of poetry. From Shakespeare to Milton to Dr. Seuss, we have a long and diverse heritage in the art form
of poetry.

So, what can you do to honor and participate in National Poetry Month? How about carrying a poem in your pocket? You could either write a piece yourself and share it with others, or you can find a poem from one of your favorite classics and sit with it, enjoy its mood and intention, and write it in a card to give a friend.

Look for poems on themes that make you happy. Poems exist on every subject imaginable. Find a good poem on love, or marriage or raising children and then write it down in your journal or on a note card and post it on the refrigerator.

Look for poetry books at local bookstores or visit websites. Encourage people in your family to try their hand at writing a poem, perhaps about a favorite pet or cooking dinner together. Any topic that brings a new light on the everyday moments can be fun to share.

Be more intentional about reading poetry newsletters, writing reviews, or letting publishers know that you appreciate the genre of poetry and want to see more books on the subject. Let a poem walk through your mind, do a little dance, and give you some new insights today.

 

NATIONAL POETRY MONTHNATIONAL POETRY MONTHNATIONAL POETRY MONTHNATIONAL POETRY MONTHNATIONAL POETRY MONTHNATIONAL POETRY MONTH

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Happy July 4th!

Happy July 4th!July 4th — Then and Now

Freedom spread across our new-born nation,
Independence sparked and stirred imagination,
Declarations read aloud,
In cities strong and proud,
Marked by cheers and welcomed celebration.

Today, parades and picnics mark the occasion,
Fireworks fill the sky with colorful elation,
Remembering yesteryear,
For what we fought so dear,
Pride fills our hearts with patriotic jubilation.

July 4th.  The day we celebrate America declaring its independence from Britain in 1776 has many customs familiar to most people.  Fireworks, parades, picnics, and other festivities are just a few that mark the patriotic occasion nowadays.  But what lesser known events transpired long ago that add to this festive national holiday?

  • During the summer of 1776, colonists created mock funerals of King George III, illustrating the end ofBritain’s grip onAmerica.
  • The U.S. Congress declared July 4th a national holiday in 1870.
  • The Declaration of Independence was read aloud in major cities across the colonies, met with cheers and fireworks.
  • Fireworks were originally an invention of ancient China, using a combination of gunpowder stuffed into bamboo sticks, all of which were thrown in to fire.  The explosive elements were later brought over to Italy by explorer Marco Polo where chemicals were added to give the fireworks their color.  They eventually made their way to theNew World(the colonies), when settlers used them to amaze or fend off Native Americans.
  • Celebrations, although modest at first, became more noticeable after the War of 1812.  In Boston, the Boston Pops Orchestra ends each July 4th musical celebration with the 1812 Overture.

These historical references not only provide great patriotic perspective, but add substance to festive activities that people may not be aware of.  This 4th of july, wear your red, white, and blue proudly as you celebrate with family and friends, remembering the journey that our nation took toward its independence.

http://www.everything4thofjuly.com/historyoffireworks.htm

http://www.factmonster.com/spot/independenceday1.html

http://www.history.com/topics/july-4th

Happy July 4th!Happy July 4th!Happy July 4th!Happy July 4th!Happy July 4th!Happy July 4th!

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Dad’s Resumé

by George Davis

Dad’s ResuméBorn a baby like me,
but grew into a man.
Became a planter –
sowing life into the Earth,
carefully pruning and
nurturing
providing the perfect balance
of love and care to ensure
a fruitful harvest.

With no formal instruction,
Dad became the world’s greatest Project Manager –
turning sugar-stained popsicle sticks
into log cabins for a full family of toothpicks.

An engineer –
he turned bunk beds into double decker buses,
that carried us to anywhere in the Universe.
It even came equipped with a custom horn
(that looked just like the pillows we slept on)
that we used to alert the natives when we arrived.

A trained physician –
Dr. Dad had the remedy
for everything!
He cured boredom,
stomach aches,
and runny noses.
Even when we came down with
frequent cases of the I-don’t-wanna-go-to-school’s,
he’d find a way to get us excited.

Believe it or not,
he was even a Captain.
Not just Captain of the Household,
but also the spaceship that we
built out of cardboard.
To this day, I’m still not sure where
he got a spaceship license from –
but, hey, he’s Dad!

He’s a magician,
motivational speaker,
and monster-in-the-closet slayer.

Superhero.

Friend.

Father.

Job(s) well done.

Dad’s ResuméDad’s ResuméDad’s ResuméDad’s ResuméDad’s ResuméDad’s Resumé

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Happy Birthday to Limerick Poet, Edward Lear!

Happy Birthday to Limerick Poet, Edward Lear!There was an Old Man with a beard,
Who said ‘It is just as I feared! –
Two Owls and a Hen,
Four Larks and a Wren,
Have all built their nests in my beard!’

There once was a poet named Edward…

The English poet who popularized the limerick was born May 12, 1812, to Ann and Jeremiah Lear in thevillageofHolloway,England, nearLondon.  Born the twenty-first child, Edward was raised by his eldest sister, also named Ann, both of whom made their way together after the family suffered financial travesty.  Lear suffered many health problems in life as well, including epilepsy, asthma, depression, and partial blindness. 

As an author, Lear published A Book of Nonsense in 1846, turning limericks into a poetic mainstay.  However, Lear’s limericks distinguished themselves from what are common today in at least two respects: he wrote in multiple formats (anywhere from two to five lines), and in his four and five-line limericks, would frequently end the first and last lines with the same word or phrase, as opposed to today’s more whimsical rhyming technique. 

The limerick, believed to have derived its name from the third largest city in Ireland, is composed of the following characteristics: 1) it contains five lines, 2) follows either an anapestic (two short syllables and one long syllable) or amphibrach (one stressed syllable flanked by two unstressed syllables) meter, and 3) typically has nine syllables on the first, second, and fifth lines, all of which end in rhyme, with five syllables in the third and fourth lines, ending in their own rhyme scheme.  Some variation may occur to accommodate an extra syllable in a word choice. 

 The following limerick below was created especially for you.    Enjoy!

Friendship by Heart

The best of friends show that they care,
The bond shared between them is rare,
         Heart-to-heart’s on the phone,
         So they’re never alone,
There’s comfort they’ll always be there.

Happy Birthday to Limerick Poet, Edward Lear!Happy Birthday to Limerick Poet, Edward Lear!Happy Birthday to Limerick Poet, Edward Lear!Happy Birthday to Limerick Poet, Edward Lear!Happy Birthday to Limerick Poet, Edward Lear!Happy Birthday to Limerick Poet, Edward Lear!